Posts Tagged ‘Terry Haran’

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Prep work in Punta Arenas

October 29, 2012

Terry writes:

Took a fifteen-minute walk to the DAMCO warehouse from the hotel and met Octavio, Gonzalo, and Paul who helped me check out my Extreme Cold Weather (ECW) clothing. Gonzalo gave me my Iridium satellite phone, and Marcella brought me my four cases, which she had kept in the DAMCO van overnight since the warehouse was closed.

I was told that I wouldn’t be flying the next day due to delays in some British Atlantic Survey arrivals to Punta Arenas. Bought some crackers, cheese, cookies, and fruit at the local Unimarc, tested my satellite phone with a quick call to Sue, and the spent then entire evening until 11 p.m. watching the CNN International coverage of Hurricane Sandy as it came ashore.

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Miami to Santiago to Punta Arenas

October 27, 2012

Terry writes:

Slept a few hours on the eight-hour flight to Santiago. I arrived a little over an hour before my scheduled departure to Punta Arenas. I located Jimmy, my DAMCO facilitator, after a few minutes of waiting in line. He performed his usual magic, waiving me through immigration, customs, and baggage transfer. Luckily I was his only customer that day, so I made my flight just as boarding had started.

Arrived in Punta Arenas on time, at 2:00 p.m. local time. Picked up by a DAMCO representative named Marcella and a contract driver and was whisked to Hotel Diego de Almagro.

While unpacking, I discovered that I had left my mittens in Boulder and my MP3 player (containing several books lovingly downloaded by Sue) on the Punta Arenas flight. Went for a one-hour windy run, showered, and went to the hotel dining room for dinner where I found a table of ten Brits. All the men were on the British Antarctic Survey Lake Ellsworth drilling team. The lone lady was Karen Fowler, a Rothera communications assistant who should have left on the Dash-7 flight south Sunday morning, but had a slight cold, and so was resting and waiting for my flight.

 

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Boulder to Miami

October 27, 2012

Terry writes:

Finished chip burning and writing case content descriptions. Got home around 2:30 a.m. Packed clothes into backpack and got Sue up around 3:15 a.m. to drive me to the bus stop. Got to the airport and checked in my bags three hours before my flight to Miami. Dozed a bit at the airport and on the flight. Had a nine-hour layover before my flight to Santiago, Chile, so I dozed a little more.

There was no sign of Hurricane Sandy in Miami, where the weather was breezy but with plenty of sunshine. My flight to Santiago, Chile left about 45 minutes late.

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Frantic in Boulder

October 26, 2012

Terry writes:

A bit frantic preparing for tomorrow’s flight. Ted Scambos and I finished packing the four cases containing the AMIGOS and UNAVCO cGPS parts and tools until about 7 pm when he and his wife Kari left to see a movie, and I went home for a quick dinner with my wife Sue.

Then I went back to work and burned and tested compact flash memory chips containing updated software for four AMIGOS units.

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Silence from Scar Inlet and Cape Disappointment

September 8, 2012

NSIDC researcher Terry Haran returns to Scar Inlet and Cape Disappointment this fall to figure out why two AMIGOS units have been silent.

Terry writes:

I return to Scar Inlet and Cape Disappointment in a month.

We haven’t received any communication from AMIGOS-2/4 at Scar Inlet since January 9, and AMIGOS-6 at Cape Disappointment has been silent since June 6. We think the AMIGOS-2/4 battery box may have shorted out due to the incursion of melt water. As for AMIGOS-6, that may have had its tower blown over or incurred some other kind of damage during a 60-knot wind event prior to its last communication. The UNAVCO continuous GPS units appear to be working but are in need of a communications upgrade, and the ones at Flask and Leppard glaciers may need their solar panels raised.

I’ve been busy preparing for the trip. I shipped AMIGOS replacement parts to Ronald Ross in Australia. Did the usual paper work for travel, began the physical qualification process required by the National Science Foundation-U.S. Antarctic Program, and collected a shipment of mechanical parts to be sent to Punta Arenas, Chile via Port Hueneme, California.

We’re not planning on visiting AMIGOS-3 since it continues to work well. It could probably use its solar panels raised, since the snow is just now touching the bottom panel. But that’s something we’ll leave for Ted during the upcoming Araon cruise with our Korean collaborators next year.

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