Posts Tagged ‘seal’

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Arrival at Rothera

November 8, 2010

Jenn writes:

So after working for Ted for fourteen years and nagging him relentlessly to take me to Antarctica I finally arrived at Rothera Station yesterday evening.  Seeing pictures in no way can compare to seeing it in person, and I was absolutely blown away by the scenery when I got off the plane. I was also quite excited to get off the plane because the heater on the plane we took from Punta Arenas was broken, so it was much warmer outside then it was on the plane ride.  I could actually feel my feet thawing out as we descended in elevation.

Weddell seals lounge in the water near Rothera Station

After we settled in our rooms we had to rush off to Saturday night dinner, which is an event at Rothera. They ask you to dress a little nicer, clean up a bit, they put nice table cloths down, and your meal is served to you.  The food was very good, and they had a vegetarian meal for me, which I was very thankful for after spending almost a week in Punta Arenas.  It’s very meaty there.

Sunday I went on a walk around the island with a few other people who are new to Rothera.  The scenery was again, amazing, and there were Weddell Seals all along the walk, however no penguins, which my daughter will be very disappointed about.  She really wants me to return home with a picture of a penguin. It’s still early in the trip so hopefully I can do that for her.

Tomorrow I will go to snow school, which I’m sure some of my co-workers at NSIDC will have a hard time envisioning me doing.  Hopefully it will teach me some valuable things because, quite honestly, I’m not sure Ted or Martin have any confidence that I’ll be able to save them if the situation arises–I can’t really blame them though.

Also a note to our NSIDC co-workers, Ted and I are getting along surprising well, although Martin might think otherwise, we are actually still speaking civilly to one another.  Anyone who has ever listened to a conversation between Ted and I will understand how sometimes we can speak to each other with a bit of an edge.  So far so good, but we haven’t been out in the field yet.

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The wild wild west

January 21, 2010

Ted writes:

We’ve been on the west side of the Antarctic Peninsula for about a week now, and we’re all very impressed with the scenery and the wild life. These pictures were acquired by the science staff of the LARISSA cruise in the past week.

Martin Truffer is an associate professor at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute

Eugene Domack is the Chief Scientist of the Larissa Cruise, a professor at Hamilton College

David Honig is a graduate student in Marine Ecosystems at Duke University

Ronald Ross is a electronics consultant for the LARISSA Glaciology program

Erin Pettit is an assistant professor at the Department of Geosciences, University of Alaska

Sun Mi Jeong is a graduate student at the Korean Institute for Polar Research

Mike McCormick is a professor at Hamilton College

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