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Antarctic firn aquifers: the team

November 16, 2018

 

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Ted Scambos

Ted Scambos is a senior research scientist at the Earth Science Observation Center, a part of the University of Colorado Boulder; and Principal Investigator on the Firn Aquifer grant. Ted’s research covers many aspects of polar science and climate change, using satellite data to track the ice and how it is evolving over time and under a changing climate. The Firn Aquifers expedition represents his 19th trip to Antarctica, but the first to this region southwest of the Antarctic Peninsula. Ted and Kari live in Lafayette Colorado, and enjoy gardening, winemaking, skiing, and hiking.

 

 

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Julie Miller

Julie Miller is a postdoctoral research scientist at the Earth Science Observation Center; and Co-Investigator on the Firn Aquifer grant. Julie’s research focuses on developing innovative techniques to map surface and subsurface ice sheet properties using airborne and spaceborne microwave instruments. She is currently developing new techniques to map firn aquifers in both Greenland and Antarctica. Previous fieldwork has taken her on instrument deployments to Greenland and the Canadian Arctic. This would have been her first expedition to Antarctica; however, a last minute injury forced her to sit this one out. Julie will provide support for the team from her home in the mountains of Utah.

 

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Clément Miège

Clément Miège is a postdoctoral research scientist affiliated with the Department of Geography at Rutgers University, but he lives and works in Seattle, working remotely from the University of Washington. His research focuses on combining ground, airborne and satellite observations to further understand snow and firn processes taking place on ice sheets and glaciers. Past fieldwork has taken him mainly to the Arctic, so he is really looking forward to going to Antarctica this time! In their free time, Clem, Michelle and little Elise enjoy exploring the endless nature the Pacific Northwest has to offer by foot, bike or ski.

 

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Bruce Wallin

Bruce Wallin is a research scientist and software developer at the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado Boulder. His background is in statistics and software engineering and he brings a diverse technical skill-set to bear on the challenges of monitoring and understanding the frozen regions of the Earth. This is not only Bruce’s first expedition to Antarctica, but indeed first trip to the field and he is thrilled to be involved. Bruce, girlfriend Zhixing, and border collie Dundee like to spend their free time in nature hiking, rock climbing, and disturbing wildlife with campfire songs.

 

 

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Lynn Montgomery

Lynn Montgomery is a second year graduate student in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Science program at the University of Colorado Boulder. Her research focuses on surface mass balance processes of the Arctic and Antarctic. She spent two field seasons in 2015 analyzing a firn aquifer in Southeast Greenland and is excited to investigate the possibility of firn aquifers in Antarctica! In her free time she enjoys hiking, trivia, and watching The Price is Right with her fiancé Brennan and two cats, Lily and Oscar.

 

 

 

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Terry Haran

Terry Haran is an associate scientist who retired January 1, 2018 after twenty years at the National Snow and Ice Data Center and 5 field trips to Antarctica. He helped develop the software contained in the two Automated Meteorological Ice Geophysics Observation Systems (AMIGOS) units that the Firn Aquifers field team will be deploying on the Wilkins and George VI ice shelves. He was called back out of retirement in August 2018 to help in refurbishing the AMIGOS units, and will be staying in Boulder during the Firn Aquifer field deployments. Terry will help monitor each unit’s health and data collection remotely by way of the Iridium satellite communications system built into each AMIGOS unit.

 

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